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Winter Greenhouse Gardening

How to heat a winter greenhouse.  Keeping warm weather plants alive during winter is best accomplished with the use of a greenhouse. Although greenhouses collect and trap heat by way of their construction design, it is sometimes necessary to provide additional heat during the coldest months. It can be expensive to utilize common fuels such as natural gas, fuel oil or even wood. 

      Applying auxiliary heat may also create humidity problems within the greenhouse. Wood stoves tend to dry things out, while gas heat may add unneeded moisture. While auxiliary heat may be necessary, you can reduce the need for it by properly orienting the greenhouse structure and applying insulation techniques.  more

Heating plants in a winter greenhouse.  Keeping a greenhouse warm in the winter is essential for maintaining steady growth of plants. Whether for profit or pleasure, a greenhouse is a great way to grow plants all year, and plants can be successfully grown in a greenhouse during winter. Heating the greenhouse properly and efficiently is the easiest way to ensure that your plants are able to grow even during the harshest winter weather. more

Overwintering plants in an unheated greenhouse.  Overwintering is the act of protecting outdoor plants from the cold during winter months. Usually this involves bringing fragile plants indoors or into a greenhouse until warm weather returns. Since most greenhouses are designed to heat themselves with the sun's rays, no additional steps are usually needed to care for plants. However, if an unheated greenhouse is in a location that receives no sunlight or if the greenhouse is covered with snow, additional steps are needed to protect plants.  more

Growing Vegetables in Unheated Greenhouses. There are two basic kinds of greenhouses that you can use to grow vegetables. A hothouse greenhouse is a heated greenhouse used to grow warm-season vegetables and tropical plants in winter. Unheated greenhouses are known as cold houses. You can use cold houses to grow vegetables in winter as well. The key to using a cold house is to select cold-tolerant vegetables such as broccoli and lettuce, or waiting until just before warm-season vegetables are in season to grow them. more

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Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News