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Winter Greenhouse Gardening

How to heat a winter greenhouse.  Keeping warm weather plants alive during winter is best accomplished with the use of a greenhouse. Although greenhouses collect and trap heat by way of their construction design, it is sometimes necessary to provide additional heat during the coldest months. It can be expensive to utilize common fuels such as natural gas, fuel oil or even wood. 

      Applying auxiliary heat may also create humidity problems within the greenhouse. Wood stoves tend to dry things out, while gas heat may add unneeded moisture. While auxiliary heat may be necessary, you can reduce the need for it by properly orienting the greenhouse structure and applying insulation techniques.  more

Heating plants in a winter greenhouse.  Keeping a greenhouse warm in the winter is essential for maintaining steady growth of plants. Whether for profit or pleasure, a greenhouse is a great way to grow plants all year, and plants can be successfully grown in a greenhouse during winter. Heating the greenhouse properly and efficiently is the easiest way to ensure that your plants are able to grow even during the harshest winter weather. more

Overwintering plants in an unheated greenhouse.  Overwintering is the act of protecting outdoor plants from the cold during winter months. Usually this involves bringing fragile plants indoors or into a greenhouse until warm weather returns. Since most greenhouses are designed to heat themselves with the sun's rays, no additional steps are usually needed to care for plants. However, if an unheated greenhouse is in a location that receives no sunlight or if the greenhouse is covered with snow, additional steps are needed to protect plants.  more

Growing Vegetables in Unheated Greenhouses. There are two basic kinds of greenhouses that you can use to grow vegetables. A hothouse greenhouse is a heated greenhouse used to grow warm-season vegetables and tropical plants in winter. Unheated greenhouses are known as cold houses. You can use cold houses to grow vegetables in winter as well. The key to using a cold house is to select cold-tolerant vegetables such as broccoli and lettuce, or waiting until just before warm-season vegetables are in season to grow them. more

News


15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In April 

Some seeds must be started indoors in most parts of the country — otherwise their fruit may not come to maturity before fall frosts:

1. Basil

2. Broccoli

3. Cauliflower

4. Celery

5. Eggplant

6. Kohlrabi

7. Mint

8. Oregano

9. Peppers

10. Tomatoes

11. Cabbage

12. Cucumbers

13. Melons

14. Parsley

15. Squash (summer and winter, including zucchini)

 


more such survival gardening from Off the Grid News