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Temporary garden from tires

     There are times, and Fall is one of them, that there is often a need for a 'temporary' garden or a site where plants can be 'heeled in' to be secure in a good spot, kept alive, and readied or held until planting (or replanting) time in the spring.

Most of us have rather full, established garden beds and coming up with new space is not always easy. Here is a solution that might appeal to some persons. It meets our general criteria: it is free, there is very little work involved, and I can either turn it into a proper garden in the spring or take it apart completely or continue to use it as a temporary holding garden.

The initial problem to be solved was this:we had some lovely miniature iris that had been divided at summer's end without thought being given to a new place for them and a friend gave us some reblooming iris that had had no spot chosen for them in our gardens.

Since our garden motto is "No Plant Left Behind" we had to come up with a solution. We got some auto tires (free) from the local tire shop. We leveled out portions of a hillside and began to stack the tires, step-like up a hillside. The tires each held 4-5 iris tubers which I identified with garden markers to make replanting or sharing in the spring easier. The depth of the tire is perfect for the iris or any other plant that needs about 6-8 inches of soil depth. We filled the tires with compost from the neighboring pile, settled in the iris, watered them and then placed large flat rocks between the plants to discourage the chickens from scratching. (This may not be a problem for many.)

This very temporary, very inexpensive solution works well for small plants. Larger plants, shrubs and trees should simply be planted where they belong.  

 

Read also about composting in tire towers.

News

 

 

The 8 Seeds That Can Store At Least 5 Years


While storage methods have a big impact on seed longevity, the type of cultivar also makes a difference. Some of the longest-lasting seeds are members of the cabbage family (Brassicaceae), but there are eight different types of vegetable seeds that will remain viable for about five years, even if not frozen:

  • Broccoli
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumber
  • Muskmelons
  • Spinach
  • Radishes
  • Lettuce


more such survival gardening from Off the Grid News