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NATIVE PLANTS

Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Plants
                 Bibliography
    ...the value and identification of native plants and animals,


We acknowledge with gratitude the work of Louise Engelstad, Pennington County Master Gardener who developed this bibliography resource which we use with her permission. Her comments about selected books follow in parenthesis. (All publications on this site are available through Amazon.com and other on-line book vendors.)

Answering the question: Why have native plants in the environment?

Bringing Nature Home, Tallamy, Douglas.  Timber press, 2009. (one of my favorites)

     A second edition of Tallamy's book has just been released with expanded text and more photographs. His work is being broadly felt in all aspects of horticulture from the home gardener to the landscaper to influencing the plant selections in nurseries and greenhouses. He stresses the importance of the vital connection between the native plant-native insect-native birds and mammals. Stated simply - our native birds and insects are not evolved to use alien or introduced plants as a food source. Introduced plants are out competing the natives and our environment is losing both native plant material and the life forms it supports.



Answering the question: How do I create a habitat for natives?
 

 Landscaping for wildlife. Henderson, Carrol.  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1987. (one of my favorites)

Wild about birds: the DNR bird feeding guide. Henderson, Carrol. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1995.

Welcoming wildlife to the garden: creating backyard and balcony habitats for wildlife. Johnson, Catherine, Susan McDiarmid, and Edward Turner.Hartley and Marks, 2002.

The Backyard birdhouse book: building nestboxes and creating natural habitats. Laubach, Rene and Christyna.Storey books, 1998.

Beastly abodes: homes for birds, bats, butterflies and other backyard wildlife. Needham, Bobbe. Sterling/Lark, 1995. (one of my favorites)

Sharing your space: A Homeowner’s guide to attracting backyard wildlife. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, 1995.

Attracting birds to your backyard: 536 ways to turn your yard and garden into a haven for your favorite birds.  Roth, Sally. Rodale Press, 1998.

Bird gardening book: the complete guide to creating a bird-friendly habitat in your backyard. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Brown and Company, 1998.

The Blue bird book: the complete guide to attracting bluebirds. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Brown and Company, 1991.


Answering the question: What are these wonderful inhabitants?

A Field guide to South Dakota turtles. Bandas, Sarah, and Kenneth Higgins. South Dakota State University, 1994.

California Center of Wildlife. Living with wildlife: how to enjoy, cope with, and protect North America’s wild creatures around your home and theirs. Sierra Club Books, 1994.

Field guide to South Dakota amphibians. Fischer, T.D., D.C. Backland, K.F. Higgins, and D.E. Naugle. South Dakota State University, 1999.

 Insects and gardens: in pursuit of a garden ecology. Grissell, Eric.Timber press, 2001.

Wild neighbors: the humane approach to living with wildlife. The Humane Society of the United States. Fulcrum Publishing, 1997.

Field guide to butterflies of South Dakota. Marrone, Gary. South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks, 2002.

Butterfly book: the complete guide to butterfly gardening, identification, and behavior. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Broan and Company, 1991. (one of my favorites)

South Dakota snakes: a guide to snake identification. Thompson, Steve, and Doug Backland. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, no date.


Answering the question: What is that plant?

 Mushrooms and other fungi: of the Black Hills and surrounding area. Gabel, Audrey and Elaine Ebbert.Black Hills State University Press, 2004.

Grassland plants of South Dakota and the northern Great Plains. Johnson, James and Gary Larsen. Bulletin B566 (revised). South Dakota State University, 1999. (can’t do without this one!)

Plants of the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains. Larson, Gary E. and James R. Johnson. Bulletin B732. South Dakota State University, 1999. (can’t do without this one!)

Wildflowers of Montana. Schiemann, Donald Mountain Press Publishing, 2005.

South Dakota weeds. South Dakota Department of Agriculture, 2002.

Weeds of the West. University of Wyoming, 2006.

Seeds of wildland plants: collecting, processing and germinating. Young, James and Cheryl Young.Timber Press, 1986.




News

Thoreau moved into his house on July 4, 1845: We are wont to forget that the sun looks on our cultivated fields and on the prairies and forests without distinction. They all reflect and absorb his rays alike, and the former make but a small part of the glorious picture which he beholds in his daily course. In his view the earth is all equally cultivated like a garden. Therefore we should receive the benefit of his light and heat with a corresponding trust and magnanimity. What though I value the seed of these beans, and harvest that in the fall of the year? This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green. These beans have results which are not harvested by me. Do they not grow for woodchucks partly? The ear of wheat (in Latin spica, obsoletely speca, from spe, hope) should not be the only hope of the husbandman; its kernel or grain (granum from gerendo, bearing) is not all that it bears. How, then, can our harvest fail? Shall I not rejoice also at the abundance of the weeds whose seeds are the granary of the birds? It matters little comparatively whether the fields fill the farmer's barns. The true husbandman will cease from anxiety, as the squirrels manifest no concern whether the woods will bear chestnuts this year or not, and finish his labor with every day, relinquishing all claim to the produce of his fields, and sacrificing in his mind not only his first but his last fruits also.

-- from Thoreau's bean field