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Wildlife

Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Plants
                 Bibliography
  

Answering the question: Why have native plants in the environment?

Bringing Nature Home, Tallamy, Douglas.  Timber press, 2009. (one of my favorites)

     A second edition of Tallamy's book has just been released with expanded text and more photographs. His work is being broadly felt in all aspects of horticulture from the home gardener to the landscaper to influencing the plant selections in nurseries and greenhouses. He stresses the importance of the vital connection between the native plant-native insect-native birds and mammals. Stated simply - our native birds and insects are not evolved to use alien or introduced plants as a food source. Introduced plants are out competing the natives and our environment is losing both native plant material and the life forms it supports.



Answering the question: How do I create a habitat for natives?
 

 Landscaping for wildlife. Henderson, Carrol.  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1987. (one of my favorites)

Wild about birds: the DNR bird feeding guide. Henderson, Carrol. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1995.

Welcoming wildlife to the garden: creating backyard and balcony habitats for wildlife. Johnson, Catherine, Susan McDiarmid, and Edward Turner.Hartley and Marks, 2002.

The Backyard birdhouse book: building nestboxes and creating natural habitats. Laubach, Rene and Christyna.Storey books, 1998.

Beastly abodes: homes for birds, bats, butterflies and other backyard wildlife. Needham, Bobbe. Sterling/Lark, 1995. (one of my favorites)

Sharing your space: A Homeowner’s guide to attracting backyard wildlife. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, 1995.

Attracting birds to your backyard: 536 ways to turn your yard and garden into a haven for your favorite birds.  Roth, Sally. Rodale Press, 1998.

Bird gardening book: the complete guide to creating a bird-friendly habitat in your backyard. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Brown and Company, 1998.

The Blue bird book: the complete guide to attracting bluebirds. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Brown and Company, 1991.

Answering the question: What are these wonderful inhabitants?

A Field guide to South Dakota turtles. Bandas, Sarah, and Kenneth Higgins. South Dakota State University, 1994.

California Center of Wildlife. Living with wildlife: how to enjoy, cope with, and protect North America’s wild creatures around your home and theirs. Sierra Club Books, 1994.

Field guide to South Dakota amphibians. Fischer, T.D., D.C. Backland, K.F. Higgins, and D.E. Naugle. South Dakota State University, 1999.

 Insects and gardens: in pursuit of a garden ecology. Grissell, Eric.Timber press, 2001.

Wild neighbors: the humane approach to living with wildlife. The Humane Society of the United States. Fulcrum Publishing, 1997.

Field guide to butterflies of South Dakota. Marrone, Gary. South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks, 2002.

Butterfly book: the complete guide to butterfly gardening, identification, and behavior. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Broan and Company, 1991. (one of my favorites)

South Dakota snakes: a guide to snake identification. Thompson, Steve, and Doug Backland. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, no date.


Answering the question: What is that plant?

 Mushrooms and other fungi: of the Black Hills and surrounding area. Gabel, Audrey and Elaine Ebbert.Black Hills State University Press, 2004.

Grassland plants of South Dakota and the northern Great Plains. Johnson, James and Gary Larsen. Bulletin B566 (revised). South Dakota State University, 1999. (can’t do without this one!)

Plants of the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains. Larson, Gary E. and James R. Johnson. Bulletin B732. South Dakota State University, 1999. (can’t do without this one!)

Wildflowers of Montana. Schiemann, Donald Mountain Press Publishing, 2005.

South Dakota weeds. South Dakota Department of Agriculture, 2002.

Weeds of the West. University of Wyoming, 2006.

Seeds of wildland plants: collecting, processing and germinating. Young, James and Cheryl Young.Timber Press, 1986.




News

December kale and collards?

Let’s take a look at a few snow-hardy vegetables that can last through the winter.

1. Spinach. This plant’s leaves may die during the winter, but the plant, itself, can survive and grow new leaves in spring. Spinach grows slowly throughout the winter. Although it can make it through the cold temperatures, spinach will look pretty beat up, so keep it covered by mulch or cold frames. A good variety to try is Savoy, or any kind with wrinkled leaves.

2. Leeks. Here is a hardy vegetable that isn’t bothered by winter’s short days. Leeks can grow well during the cold months. Bandit and Bleu de Solaise varieties are favorable for winter leeks, as well as “blue-green” kinds that can survive down to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 Celsius.

3. Kale and collards. Both of these vegetables are rich in flavor. Collards are actually more freeze-tolerate than kale. Blue Max is a favored variety, and has high yields and can survive in winter temperatures down to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 degrees Celsius. Other hardy types are Red and White Russian Kale, which do best when covered in the winter.

4. Parsnips. Sugars accumulate in parsnips when there is a frost, and snow can actually make parsnips sweeter. They keep well in the winter ground. They take 130 days to grow. Parsnips should still be covered in freezing temperatures to ensure success, and the lowest temperatures parsnips do well in are 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 degrees Celsius.

5. Lettuce. Young lettuce plants tend to tolerate cold temperatures better than mature plants. Keep lettuce plants protected, either by cold frames, hoops or tunnels. Lettuce can survive in temperatures down to 10 degrees Fahrenheit or -12 degrees Celsius.  If you cover the plants with multiple layers, lettuce can survive down to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 degrees Celsius. 

more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News