headerphoto

As habitat for wildlife

Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Plants
                 Bibliography
  

Answering the question: Why have native plants in the environment?

Bringing Nature Home, Tallamy, Douglas.  Timber press, 2009. (one of my favorites)

     A second edition of Tallamy's book has just been released with expanded text and more photographs. His work is being broadly felt in all aspects of horticulture from the home gardener to the landscaper to influencing the plant selections in nurseries and greenhouses. He stresses the importance of the vital connection between the native plant-native insect-native birds and mammals. Stated simply - our native birds and insects are not evolved to use alien or introduced plants as a food source. Introduced plants are out competing the natives and our environment is losing both native plant material and the life forms it supports.



Answering the question: How do I create a habitat for natives?
 

 Landscaping for wildlife. Henderson, Carrol.  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1987. (one of my favorites)

Wild about birds: the DNR bird feeding guide. Henderson, Carrol. Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1995.

Welcoming wildlife to the garden: creating backyard and balcony habitats for wildlife. Johnson, Catherine, Susan McDiarmid, and Edward Turner.Hartley and Marks, 2002.

The Backyard birdhouse book: building nestboxes and creating natural habitats. Laubach, Rene and Christyna.Storey books, 1998.

Beastly abodes: homes for birds, bats, butterflies and other backyard wildlife. Needham, Bobbe. Sterling/Lark, 1995. (one of my favorites)

Sharing your space: A Homeowner’s guide to attracting backyard wildlife. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, 1995.

Attracting birds to your backyard: 536 ways to turn your yard and garden into a haven for your favorite birds.  Roth, Sally. Rodale Press, 1998.

Bird gardening book: the complete guide to creating a bird-friendly habitat in your backyard. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Brown and Company, 1998.

The Blue bird book: the complete guide to attracting bluebirds. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Brown and Company, 1991.

Answering the question: What are these wonderful inhabitants?

A Field guide to South Dakota turtles. Bandas, Sarah, and Kenneth Higgins. South Dakota State University, 1994.

California Center of Wildlife. Living with wildlife: how to enjoy, cope with, and protect North America’s wild creatures around your home and theirs. Sierra Club Books, 1994.

Field guide to South Dakota amphibians. Fischer, T.D., D.C. Backland, K.F. Higgins, and D.E. Naugle. South Dakota State University, 1999.

 Insects and gardens: in pursuit of a garden ecology. Grissell, Eric.Timber press, 2001.

Wild neighbors: the humane approach to living with wildlife. The Humane Society of the United States. Fulcrum Publishing, 1997.

Field guide to butterflies of South Dakota. Marrone, Gary. South Dakota Game, Fish, and Parks, 2002.

Butterfly book: the complete guide to butterfly gardening, identification, and behavior. Stokes, Donald and Lillian. Little, Broan and Company, 1991. (one of my favorites)

South Dakota snakes: a guide to snake identification. Thompson, Steve, and Doug Backland. South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, no date.


Answering the question: What is that plant?

 Mushrooms and other fungi: of the Black Hills and surrounding area. Gabel, Audrey and Elaine Ebbert.Black Hills State University Press, 2004.

Grassland plants of South Dakota and the northern Great Plains. Johnson, James and Gary Larsen. Bulletin B566 (revised). South Dakota State University, 1999. (can’t do without this one!)

Plants of the Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains. Larson, Gary E. and James R. Johnson. Bulletin B732. South Dakota State University, 1999. (can’t do without this one!)

Wildflowers of Montana. Schiemann, Donald Mountain Press Publishing, 2005.

South Dakota weeds. South Dakota Department of Agriculture, 2002.

Weeds of the West. University of Wyoming, 2006.

Seeds of wildland plants: collecting, processing and germinating. Young, James and Cheryl Young.Timber Press, 1986.




News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News