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Art of Loading Brush

Our lives seem to be centrally controlled by government and corporate managers in big coastal cities. But should commodities always come from somewhere else?         The content and social values of our print and broadcast media tend to originate from the same source.  A review interview in Time about Wendell Berry's new book gives us these quotes about founding an authentic rural identity:

"This has been a dominant idea throughout our history: if you don’t have it here, you can get it from somewhere else. If you use up this commodity here, you can’t produce it here anymore, you’ve worn out the possibility here, get it from somewhere else. Or if you’re short of labor or you’re too good for certain kinds of labor, go to Africa and get some slaves. That recourse has haunted us, has plagued us to death.

"We had a big garden when the children were young and we were young and strong. We raised virtually everything we ate. We had poultry and two milk cows, and we fattened two meat hogs every year, and a calf, and grew the big garden. It’s extremely gratifying to sit down to a meal you’ve grown every bit of."

forwarded by a Black Hills gardener

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Not everyone is always in the mood to read text when visiting the computer for the latest about gardening.  We can’t forget that just hearing and seeing is the oldest way of knowing about the world.  

 

YouTube also has the informality and spontaneity and honesty of ordinary people presenting garden information, perhaps refreshing for those tired of the slick segments common on TV.

 

If you can put up with the accent of an English gardener, you might find this YouTube video motivating and easier to digest.