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Farmers Markets and Survivalism

Food from faraway places will be the first to disappear after long-term disasters. Beyond the backyard garden, local growers and farmers will have all the available food.  

In "How to Buy Local Food," Leigh Erin Connealy's Health News reinforces the benefits of the local farmer's market but warns that some such markets don't adequately police fraudulent offering: "Spotting a fake isn’t always easy. The sign can say 'local,' and—while it pays to converse with whomever is running the stand—there’s always a chance that they’ll tell you what they think you want to hear."

Connealy advises that personally getting to know the farmers and their farms, perhaps buying directly, is the best insurance policy if the grocery-store supply-chain goes down.  Some farmers will even allow you to barter your hired-man-type help for some of the food. In the worst of times, you can hire yourself out as an armed security guard in the same way.

News

Drowning In Tomatoes? Try Something Different This Year.

 

If you’re a home gardener about to drowned in tomatoes rolling in off the vines and demanding to be consumed before they go bad, hang on. Here comes a life preserver.


I chop up a small bowlful of fresh very ripe tomatoes, add chopped red onion or scallions, minced garlic, chopped fresh basil, and extra-virgin olive oil.  I sometimes add Kalamata olives. I make this dish in the morning and let it set on the kitchen table all day. By evening meal time, the flavors have melded nicely, and I serve it over hot cooked spaghetti noodles and top it with fresh grated parmesan for an easy meal on a hot summer day.


other such survival gardening from Off the Grid News