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Farmers Markets and Survivalism

Food from faraway places will be the first to disappear after long-term disasters. Beyond the backyard garden, local growers and farmers will have all the available food.  

In "How to Buy Local Food," Leigh Erin Connealy's Health News reinforces the benefits of the local farmer's market but warns that some such markets don't adequately police fraudulent offering: "Spotting a fake isn’t always easy. The sign can say 'local,' and—while it pays to converse with whomever is running the stand—there’s always a chance that they’ll tell you what they think you want to hear."

Connealy advises that personally getting to know the farmers and their farms, perhaps buying directly, is the best insurance policy if the grocery-store supply-chain goes down.  Some farmers will even allow you to barter your hired-man-type help for some of the food. In the worst of times, you can hire yourself out as an armed security guard in the same way.

News

6 Delicious Edibles You Can Grow Indoors All Winter

 

Most homes are heated to a comfortably warm temperature range of 65 to 75F during winter. This is ideal for growing many vegetables, so the winter cold is not as much of an issue here as low-light conditions. Your choice would be limited unless you provide sufficient grow lights to imitate the sunny outdoors.

    As a general rule, leafy vegetables can manage with much less light than root vegetables. Fruiting vegetables such as tomatoes and eggplants need more light to ensure a good yield.

 

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