headerphoto

Farmers Markets and Survivalism

Food from faraway places will be the first to disappear after long-term disasters. Beyond the backyard garden, local growers and farmers will have all the available food.  

In "How to Buy Local Food," Leigh Erin Connealy's Health News reinforces the benefits of the local farmer's market but warns that some such markets don't adequately police fraudulent offering: "Spotting a fake isn’t always easy. The sign can say “local,” and—while it pays to converse with whomever is running the stand—there’s always a chance that they’ll tell you what they think you want to hear."

Connealy advises that personally getting to know the farmers and their farms, perhaps buying directly, is the best insurance policy if the grocery-store supply-chain goes down.  Some farmers will even allow you to barter your hired-man-type help for some of the food.  In the worst of times, you hire yourself out as an armed security guard in the same way.

News


15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In March 

Some seeds must be started indoors in most parts of the country — otherwise their fruit may not come to maturity before fall frosts:

1. Basil

2. Broccoli

3. Cauliflower

4. Celery

5. Eggplant

6. Kohlrabi

7. Mint

8. Oregano

9. Peppers

10. Tomatoes

11. Cabbage

12. Cucumbers

13. Melons

14. Parsley

15. Squash (summer and winter, including zucchini)

 


more such survival gardening from Off the Grid News