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Farmers Markets and Survivalism

Food from faraway places will be the first to disappear after long-term disasters. Beyond the backyard garden, local growers and farmers will have all the available food.  

In "How to Buy Local Food," Leigh Erin Connealy's Health News reinforces the benefits of the local farmer's market but warns that some such markets don't adequately police fraudulent offering: "Spotting a fake isn’t always easy. The sign can say 'local,' and—while it pays to converse with whomever is running the stand—there’s always a chance that they’ll tell you what they think you want to hear."

Connealy advises that personally getting to know the farmers and their farms, perhaps buying directly, is the best insurance policy if the grocery-store supply-chain goes down.  Some farmers will even allow you to barter your hired-man-type help for some of the food. In the worst of times, you can hire yourself out as an armed security guard in the same way.

News

Miss Gardening? Grow Green Beans Indoors This Winter

 

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For gardeners who just can’t stand to keep their hands out of the soil for any length of time, growing food indoors in containers can be a great pastime during the winter months.

 

Green beans are a relatively quick-growing vegetable that can be grown inside your home and also look quite beautiful, as well.

 

Plants that you are growing indoors can be started any time of the year, but you still need to remember that they have certain environmental requirements. Green beans need plenty of light, so you will need to place them in a part of your home where they can get a minimum of six hours of sunlight each day. Alternatively, grow lights can work if you do not have a window that gets enough sun.