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Walmart Emergency Food

 

 

 

 

Walmart.com (click)

Sometimes we don't use are gardens wisely to grow food for our families. Even worse, we're losing the skills that our grandparents knew instinctively, including canning, butchering, root cellars, and long-term preservation for survival.

Like most grocery stores around the Black Hills, Walmart uses the Kanban or just-in-time method to stock its shelves as the items are depleted by shoppers.  There's not much "back room" inventory, just loading docks where trucks roll in on a daily basis to resupply the store.

Both Walmart and Sam's Club now have impressive online offerings, and the local stores are carrying more and more long-term survival foods from companies like Augason Farms, headquartered in Salt Lake City. 

Local gardening circles need to do a better job reinforcing the connection between growing vegetables and eating and cooking.  The abundance of produce and prepared meals at grocery stores removes all but a dilenttantish interest for many.    


 


 

 

News

Drowning In Tomatoes? Try Something Different This Year.

 

If you’re a home gardener about to drowned in tomatoes rolling in off the vines and demanding to be consumed before they go bad, hang on. Here comes a life preserver.


I chop up a small bowlful of fresh very ripe tomatoes, add chopped red onion or scallions, minced garlic, chopped fresh basil, and extra-virgin olive oil.  I sometimes add Kalamata olives. I make this dish in the morning and let it set on the kitchen table all day. By evening meal time, the flavors have melded nicely, and I serve it over hot cooked spaghetti noodles and top it with fresh grated parmesan for an easy meal on a hot summer day.


other such survival gardening from Off the Grid News