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Blacksmithing garden tools DIY

The ancient art of blacksmithing developed long before there was any electricity or power anything.  Things were made by hand in the “backroom” but using techniques that could still be replicated tomorrow if our future was “off grid” and we were living on farms or villages cut off from the larger outside world.  We could make our own garden tools.


Master blacksmith Jack Parks of Piedmont SD works on various projects with metallurgical engineering students at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in Rapid City.  Students in the Bladesmithing video are “using my place to forge their entry to a nationwide competition with other colleges,” he says.


Some of the equipment in the video is powered, of course, but based upon ancient practice, so the processes can be brought back.  Students are working on a Viking sword, but the same techniques can produce a variety of garden tools if no manufactured ones were available.

NEWS ALERT: the Metallurgical Engineering Department at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology never felt like an underdog in San Diego earlier this month [March 2017] as it seized first place in an international competition among universities, winning the Grand Prize by forging a historic Norwegian langseax sword:  “The sword was forged by a student team representing the South Dakota School of Mines, with steel smelted in a historic manner with local materials gathered from the Black Hills.” 


(forwarded by a Black Hills gardener)

News

6 Delicious Edibles You Can Grow Indoors All Winter

 

Most homes are heated to a comfortably warm temperature range of 65 to 75F during winter. This is ideal for growing many vegetables, so the winter cold is not as much of an issue here as low-light conditions. Your choice would be limited unless you provide sufficient grow lights to imitate the sunny outdoors.

    As a general rule, leafy vegetables can manage with much less light than root vegetables. Fruiting vegetables such as tomatoes and eggplants need more light to ensure a good yield.

 

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