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2017 Master Gardener training

Latest information on Master Gardener training to be held this summer...

...from Dave Graper, South Dakota Master Gardener Coordinator, Extension Horticulture Specialist and Professor of Horticulture.

South Dakota Extension Master Gardener training classes are now being formed. To becomes a Master Gardener, trainees must attend eight days of hands-on classroom training,. Supplemental training information will be available online for individuals to review.

The 2017 Master Gardener training is returning to hands-on sessions. Dr. Graper commented further, "This gives us a chance to directly interact with the Extension Master gardener trainees and for them to get to know each other as well as other Extension Master Gardeners that are already in their area of the state."

Topics that will be covered by the classroom and hands-on training include: Introduction, Basic Botany and Taxonomy; Soils and Fertilizers; Turf and Weed Management; Plant Pathology/Composting; Tree and Shrub care, pest management; Tree and Shrub ID, planting and landscape use; IPM and Pestcides; Insects, Pollinators and Biodiversity; Small fruits and Tree fruits; Vegetables and Season Extension; Herbaceous  ornamentals, native plants and plant propagation; Plant diagnosis; and Working as a Master Gardener.

The hands-on training sites for 2017 are Sioux Falls, Aberdeen and Spearfish. Participants may attend anyof the three sites.

The first class will include picking up the training manual and learning the log-on procedure to access the online material. Trainees will need access to a computer and an email address to access the online material. More information will be forwarded to participants as we get closer to the beginning of training.

Training will be held from 8:30 A.M. to 4:30 P.M. local time. The training dates (in Spearfish) June 8, 15, 22, 29, July 13, 20, 27 and August 3.

The class fee is $190 for individuals who commit to becoming a South Dakota Extension Master Gardener. To become a Master Gardener intern, an individual must complete the course and pass the final exam. As an intern, an individual must provide 50 hours of volunteer service to the people of South Dakota over the next two years to become a Master Gardener.

The fee for the course without the volunteer commitment is $540. In both cases, the fee includes access to the online training materials, a resource manual and the hands-on classes. However, individuals that sign up for this non-volunteer requiring training option cannot earn the title of becoming a South Dakota Extension Master Gardener.

To participate in the 2017 Master Gardener training complete the online application through http://igrow.org. Instructions on how to access the application will be available soon in an article that will be found at http://igrow.org/gardens/master-gardeners/.

The application deadline is May 1, 2017.

Questions? call 394-1722.

News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News