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Greenhouses, Old Doors, Windows

Greenhouses are a lot like spring flowers.  You can pay big bucks at a nursery or boxstore to get the showiest possible flowering plants, specimens which have been mass-produced in a greenhouse factory elsewhere.  Showy springtime flowers have excellent WOW appeal at the time, but begin to fade right away.  Home greenhouses with polycarbonate sides are similar: they look good out of the starting blocks, but the sun and wind give them short lives.

      Old doors and windows will last.  The cost can be almost nothing.  As with Lego blocks, they can be pieced together to achieve creative and pleasing architectures, though some gardeners might not care for beauty as such, preferring strictly a utilitarian approach (at the worst, it can be a rural slum).  Old sheds can be pressed back into service by replacing the wooden or metal siding with glass.

     Recycling old doors, windows, and sheds doesn't mean that the gardener is poverty-stricken, however.  Even some millionaires like the challenge of not wasting money on simply buying everything new and having it installed by so-called professionals.  Who knows when Depression era skills will be needed again?

10x16 greenhouse in SW Ontario- salvaged windows for the glass, salvaged doors, an old deck for 1/2 the floor and the other half is discounted paving stone. The walls that aren't glass are insulated and the north side of the roof is insulated and asphalt shingles. Several back and side windows open and there is an automatic venting window in the roof near the ridgeline. 

http://www.inspirationgreen.com/greenhouses-made-from-old-windows-and-doors.html

News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News