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Two Spotted Fruit Fly - Drosophila

First posted July, 2014

A serious threat to fruit crops, two spotted fruit fly has arrived in South Dakota and is already causing serious damage in berry, apple, plum and tomato crops. The insect was first discovered in California in 2008. Since that time, reports have confirmed its presence virtually country wide.

 

The life cycle is attention-getting: The female fly lays up to 350 eggs at a time inside the fruit. The larvae (maggots) feed (and destroy) inside the fruit for 5-7 days. The pupae live inside or outside of the fruit. There is a generation of flies produced every 8-16 days. The injury (egg deposition site) looks like a tiny scar on the skin of the fruit. THE SKIN COLLAPSES IN 2-3 DAYS AND MOLDS.


What can we do? Right now the best course of action is to hang fly traps amongst potential host crops in your yard. Check the traps WEEKLY. It is quite possible to identify the male (spotted wings) with the naked eye. 

Here’s the website for the spotted wing drosophila handout. http://entomology.osu.edu/welty/pdf/

SWD_Ohio_handoutV12.pdf 

and the pesticides for homeowners.https://docs.google.com/a/umn.edu/file/d

/0B21gDin3TZqgOWlxaFNLWmhpZkk/edit?pli=1 page 2.

 

News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News