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Two Spotted Fruit Fly - Drosophila

First posted July, 2014

A serious threat to fruit crops, two spotted fruit fly has arrived in South Dakota and is already causing serious damage in berry, apple, plum and tomato crops. The insect was first discovered in California in 2008. Since that time, reports have confirmed its presence virtually country wide.

 

The life cycle is attention-getting: The female fly lays up to 350 eggs at a time inside the fruit. The larvae (maggots) feed (and destroy) inside the fruit for 5-7 days. The pupae live inside or outside of the fruit. There is a generation of flies produced every 8-16 days. The injury (egg deposition site) looks like a tiny scar on the skin of the fruit. THE SKIN COLLAPSES IN 2-3 DAYS AND MOLDS.


What can we do? Right now the best course of action is to hang fly traps amongst potential host crops in your yard. Check the traps WEEKLY. It is quite possible to identify the male (spotted wings) with the naked eye. 

Here’s the website for the spotted wing drosophila handout. http://entomology.osu.edu/welty/pdf/

SWD_Ohio_handoutV12.pdf 

and the pesticides for homeowners.https://docs.google.com/a/umn.edu/file/d

/0B21gDin3TZqgOWlxaFNLWmhpZkk/edit?pli=1 page 2.

 

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