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REDWORMS

 

Yes! It's true! Gardeners are discovering a NEW TOOL to utilize to enrich their gardens and their outdoor containers as well as their houseplants. It is the marvelous, nutrient-rich castings (poop) of the small (3") redworm, eisenia foetida.

Teaching people how to keep redworms in bins in the home to consume clean kitchen waste (fruit and veggie peels, tea bags and grounds, coffee grounds and filters, eggshells, etc.) became the life work of Mary Appelhof, a scientist and educator whose book, Worms Eat My Garbage, published in 1982, ignited an awareness of how easy and worthwhile and beneficial (for the garden...and the environment) it is to "partner" with the redworms in reducing potential resources for the garden ...vermicastings.


The book, and advocates of the book launched a huge effort to learn about redworms and to see beyond the "yuck factor" of garbage and see it as a potential resource. Keeping worms is a popular practice in schoolrooms, amongst yard-impoverished apartment dwellers, ecology enthusiasts, gardeners and more. All are drawn by its low cost, simplicity and non-technical aspects.

Numerous companies now offer various vermicasting 'systems' almost all of which are versions of stacked trays that encourage the worms migrate through as they consume the garbage and deposit castings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News


15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In March 

Some seeds must be started indoors in most parts of the country — otherwise their fruit may not come to maturity before fall frosts:

1. Basil

2. Broccoli

3. Cauliflower

4. Celery

5. Eggplant

6. Kohlrabi

7. Mint

8. Oregano

9. Peppers

10. Tomatoes

11. Cabbage

12. Cucumbers

13. Melons

14. Parsley

15. Squash (summer and winter, including zucchini)

 


more such survival gardening from Off the Grid News