headerphoto

REDWORMS

 

Yes! It's true! Gardeners are discovering a NEW TOOL to utilize to enrich their gardens and their outdoor containers as well as their houseplants. It is the marvelous, nutrient-rich castings (poop) of the small (3") redworm, eisenia foetida.

Teaching people how to keep redworms in bins in the home to consume clean kitchen waste (fruit and veggie peels, tea bags and grounds, coffee grounds and filters, eggshells, etc.) became the life work of Mary Appelhof, a scientist and educator whose book, Worms Eat My Garbage, published in 1982, ignited an awareness of how easy and worthwhile and beneficial (for the garden...and the environment) it is to "partner" with the redworms in reducing potential resources for the garden ...vermicastings.


The book, and advocates of the book launched a huge effort to learn about redworms and to see beyond the "yuck factor" of garbage and see it as a potential resource. Keeping worms is a popular practice in schoolrooms, amongst yard-impoverished apartment dwellers, ecology enthusiasts, gardeners and more. All are drawn by its low cost, simplicity and non-technical aspects.

Numerous companies now offer various vermicasting 'systems' almost all of which are versions of stacked trays that encourage the worms migrate through as they consume the garbage and deposit castings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News