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REDWORMS

 

Yes! It's true! Gardeners are discovering a NEW TOOL to utilize to enrich their gardens and their outdoor containers as well as their houseplants. It is the marvelous, nutrient-rich castings (poop) of the small (3") redworm, eisenia foetida.

Teaching people how to keep redworms in bins in the home to consume clean kitchen waste (fruit and veggie peels, tea bags and grounds, coffee grounds and filters, eggshells, etc.) became the life work of Mary Appelhof, a scientist and educator whose book, Worms Eat My Garbage, published in 1982, ignited an awareness of how easy and worthwhile and beneficial (for the garden...and the environment) it is to "partner" with the redworms in reducing potential resources for the garden ...vermicastings.


The book, and advocates of the book launched a huge effort to learn about redworms and to see beyond the "yuck factor" of garbage and see it as a potential resource. Keeping worms is a popular practice in schoolrooms, amongst yard-impoverished apartment dwellers, ecology enthusiasts, gardeners and more. All are drawn by its low cost, simplicity and non-technical aspects.

Numerous companies now offer various vermicasting 'systems' almost all of which are versions of stacked trays that encourage the worms migrate through as they consume the garbage and deposit castings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News

Drowning In Tomatoes? Try Something Different This Year.

 

If you’re a home gardener about to drowned in tomatoes rolling in off the vines and demanding to be consumed before they go bad, hang on. Here comes a life preserver.


I chop up a small bowlful of fresh very ripe tomatoes, add chopped red onion or scallions, minced garlic, chopped fresh basil, and extra-virgin olive oil.  I sometimes add Kalamata olives. I make this dish in the morning and let it set on the kitchen table all day. By evening meal time, the flavors have melded nicely, and I serve it over hot cooked spaghetti noodles and top it with fresh grated parmesan for an easy meal on a hot summer day.


other such survival gardening from Off the Grid News