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REDWORMS

 

Yes! It's true! Gardeners are discovering a NEW TOOL to utilize to enrich their gardens and their outdoor containers as well as their houseplants. It is the marvelous, nutrient-rich castings (poop) of the small (3") redworm, eisenia foetida.

Teaching people how to keep redworms in bins in the home to consume clean kitchen waste (fruit and veggie peels, tea bags and grounds, coffee grounds and filters, eggshells, etc.) became the life work of Mary Appelhof, a scientist and educator whose book, Worms Eat My Garbage, published in 1982, ignited an awareness of how easy and worthwhile and beneficial (for the garden...and the environment) it is to "partner" with the redworms in reducing potential resources for the garden ...vermicastings.


The book, and advocates of the book launched a huge effort to learn about redworms and to see beyond the "yuck factor" of garbage and see it as a potential resource. Keeping worms is a popular practice in schoolrooms, amongst yard-impoverished apartment dwellers, ecology enthusiasts, gardeners and more. All are drawn by its low cost, simplicity and non-technical aspects.

Numerous companies now offer various vermicasting 'systems' almost all of which are versions of stacked trays that encourage the worms migrate through as they consume the garbage and deposit castings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News

How To Store Potatoes For 20-Plus Years

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If 20 years sounds like a long time to store potatoes, then it might surprise you to know that “fresh” potatoes in the grocery store are often 11 months old when you buy them. Modern developments in commercial food storage allow growers to store produce with a chemical (1-methylcyclopropene), which extends the shelf life of vegetables.

 

Of course, fresh potatoes won’t last 20 years, but you can dehydrate them to get that kind of long-term shelf life while maintaining nutritional value.




Now save carrots for 20 years with a dehydrator