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videos of insects


On the theory that we can neither dislike nor advocate for insects unless we know a bit about them,get a fresh cup of tea or coffee and watch these short videos (below) about insects. These are youtube short shots ranging from one minute in length to seven. Some have a musical background and some are silent. There is a written text for the dangerous insects. There is no spoken narration. Enjoy!

Insects in a minute

Another minute with insects

Ten extremely dangerous insects

The Beauty of Insects


The Jumping Spider


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A TED talk: Respect the Bugs. This is a wonderful film featuring Marc Berman stressing the point (very important to gardeners..as well as the rest of us) that 'respect' is a word built from Latin roots meaning simply "to see again", to "take another look." Berman illustrates the complexity of insect behavior in a single small hole along a California gravel road and then enthusiastically introduces us to the charming (yes, charming) jumping spider. The critter is clever, an impressive technological marvel and astonishingly musical and athletic as a male woos a moderately interested female. It's a fun video to watch and there is much to learn and remember. (Hint: RESPECT begins with 'seeing again!)

News

Shade and gardens.  My mind has been turned to the subject of fruit and shade trees in a garden. There are those who say that trees shade the garden too much, and interfere with the growth of the vegetables. There may be something in this: but when I go down the potato rows, the rays of the sun glancing upon my shining blade, the sweat pouring from my face, I should be grateful for shade. What is a garden for? The pleasure of man. I should take much more pleasure in a shady garden. Am I to be sacrificed, broiled, roasted, for the sake of the increased vigor of a few vegetables? The thing is perfectly absurd. 

      If I were rich, I think I would have my garden covered with an awning, so that it would be comfortable to work in it. It might roll up and be removable, as the great awning of the Roman Coliseum was,—not like the Boston one, which went off in a high wind. Another very good way to do, and probably not so expensive as the awning, would be to have four persons of foreign birth carry a sort of canopy over you as you hoed. And there might be a person at each end of the row with some cool and refreshing drink. Agriculture is still in a very barbarous stage. I hope to live yet to see the day when I can do my gardening, as tragedy is done, to slow and soothing music, and attended by some of the comforts I have named. These things come so forcibly into my mind sometimes as I work, that perhaps, when a wandering breeze lifts my straw hat, or a bird lights on a near currant-bush, and shakes out a full-throated summer song, I almost expect to find the cooling drink and the hospitable entertainment at the end of the row. But I never do. There is nothing to be done but to turn round, and hoe back to the other end.

from My Summer in a Garden