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videos of insects


On the theory that we can neither dislike nor advocate for insects unless we know a bit about them,get a fresh cup of tea or coffee and watch these short videos (below) about insects. These are youtube short shots ranging from one minute in length to seven. Some have a musical background and some are silent. There is a written text for the dangerous insects. There is no spoken narration. Enjoy!

Insects in a minute

Another minute with insects

Ten extremely dangerous insects

The Beauty of Insects


The Jumping Spider


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A TED talk: Respect the Bugs. This is a wonderful film featuring Marc Berman stressing the point (very important to gardeners..as well as the rest of us) that 'respect' is a word built from Latin roots meaning simply "to see again", to "take another look." Berman illustrates the complexity of insect behavior in a single small hole along a California gravel road and then enthusiastically introduces us to the charming (yes, charming) jumping spider. The critter is clever, an impressive technological marvel and astonishingly musical and athletic as a male woos a moderately interested female. It's a fun video to watch and there is much to learn and remember. (Hint: RESPECT begins with 'seeing again!)

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Thoreau moved into his house on July 4, 1845: We are wont to forget that the sun looks on our cultivated fields and on the prairies and forests without distinction. They all reflect and absorb his rays alike, and the former make but a small part of the glorious picture which he beholds in his daily course. In his view the earth is all equally cultivated like a garden. Therefore we should receive the benefit of his light and heat with a corresponding trust and magnanimity. What though I value the seed of these beans, and harvest that in the fall of the year? This broad field which I have looked at so long looks not to me as the principal cultivator, but away from me to influences more genial to it, which water and make it green. These beans have results which are not harvested by me. Do they not grow for woodchucks partly? The ear of wheat (in Latin spica, obsoletely speca, from spe, hope) should not be the only hope of the husbandman; its kernel or grain (granum from gerendo, bearing) is not all that it bears. How, then, can our harvest fail? Shall I not rejoice also at the abundance of the weeds whose seeds are the granary of the birds? It matters little comparatively whether the fields fill the farmer's barns. The true husbandman will cease from anxiety, as the squirrels manifest no concern whether the woods will bear chestnuts this year or not, and finish his labor with every day, relinquishing all claim to the produce of his fields, and sacrificing in his mind not only his first but his last fruits also.

-- from Thoreau's bean field