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Insects on YouTube

On the theory that we can neither dislike nor advocate for insects unless we know a bit about them,get a fresh cup of tea or coffee and watch these short videos (below) about insects. These are youtube short shots ranging from one minute in length to seven. Some have a musical background and some are silent. There is a written text for the dangerous insects. There is no spoken narration. Enjoy!

Insects in a minute

Another minute with insects

Ten extremely dangerous insects

The Beauty of Insects


The Jumping Spider


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A TED talk: Respect the Bugs. This is a wonderful film featuring Marc Berman stressing the point (very important to gardeners..as well as the rest of us) that 'respect' is a word built from Latin roots meaning simply "to see again", to "take another look." Berman illustrates the complexity of insect behavior in a single small hole along a California gravel road and then enthusiastically introduces us to the charming (yes, charming) jumping spider. The critter is clever, an impressive technological marvel and astonishingly musical and athletic as a male woos a moderately interested female. It's a fun video to watch and there is much to learn and remember. (Hint: RESPECT begins with 'seeing again!)

News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News