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videos of insects


On the theory that we can neither dislike nor advocate for insects unless we know a bit about them,get a fresh cup of tea or coffee and watch these short videos (below) about insects. These are youtube short shots ranging from one minute in length to seven. Some have a musical background and some are silent. There is a written text for the dangerous insects. There is no spoken narration. Enjoy!

Insects in a minute

Another minute with insects

Ten extremely dangerous insects

The Beauty of Insects


The Jumping Spider


 

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A TED talk: Respect the Bugs. This is a wonderful film featuring Marc Berman stressing the point (very important to gardeners..as well as the rest of us) that 'respect' is a word built from Latin roots meaning simply "to see again", to "take another look." Berman illustrates the complexity of insect behavior in a single small hole along a California gravel road and then enthusiastically introduces us to the charming (yes, charming) jumping spider. The critter is clever, an impressive technological marvel and astonishingly musical and athletic as a male woos a moderately interested female. It's a fun video to watch and there is much to learn and remember. (Hint: RESPECT begins with 'seeing again!)

News

December kale and collards?

Let’s take a look at a few snow-hardy vegetables that can last through the winter.

1. Spinach. This plant’s leaves may die during the winter, but the plant, itself, can survive and grow new leaves in spring. Spinach grows slowly throughout the winter. Although it can make it through the cold temperatures, spinach will look pretty beat up, so keep it covered by mulch or cold frames. A good variety to try is Savoy, or any kind with wrinkled leaves.

2. Leeks. Here is a hardy vegetable that isn’t bothered by winter’s short days. Leeks can grow well during the cold months. Bandit and Bleu de Solaise varieties are favorable for winter leeks, as well as “blue-green” kinds that can survive down to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 Celsius.

3. Kale and collards. Both of these vegetables are rich in flavor. Collards are actually more freeze-tolerate than kale. Blue Max is a favored variety, and has high yields and can survive in winter temperatures down to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 degrees Celsius. Other hardy types are Red and White Russian Kale, which do best when covered in the winter.

4. Parsnips. Sugars accumulate in parsnips when there is a frost, and snow can actually make parsnips sweeter. They keep well in the winter ground. They take 130 days to grow. Parsnips should still be covered in freezing temperatures to ensure success, and the lowest temperatures parsnips do well in are 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 degrees Celsius.

5. Lettuce. Young lettuce plants tend to tolerate cold temperatures better than mature plants. Keep lettuce plants protected, either by cold frames, hoops or tunnels. Lettuce can survive in temperatures down to 10 degrees Fahrenheit or -12 degrees Celsius.  If you cover the plants with multiple layers, lettuce can survive down to 0 degrees Fahrenheit or -18 degrees Celsius. 

more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News