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HERBS


Sweet Cicely ( photo) is just one of the shade tolerant   herbs. Others are Pennyroyal, violets, Sweet Woodruff, Corsican mint, Blue Cohosh, Black Hellebore, Chervil, Valerian and Lemon Balm.


Window box herbs include the following: Marjoram, nasturtium (photo), bush basil, chives, corn salad, catmint, scented geraniums, hyssop, lemon balm, parsley, rosemary, savory, violet, French tarragon.





Most people can find a place on a window sill for a pot or two of herbs. Consider some of these: dwarf green basil, dark opal basil (photo below), chives, ginger, chervil, oregano, summer savory, parsley, rosemary, sweet marjoram, sage and thyme. 

We all know that some flowers are pretty enough to eat and in fact that is exactly what you can do with these: beebalm, borage (photo below), calendula, chives, clovepinks, lavender, mints, nasturtium and sweet violets.


And finally, here are some herbs that do well in rich soil (if you are fortunate enough to have some). Plant basil, chives, costmary (photo below), ginger, scented geraniums, and sweet woodruff.

News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News