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Defining 'Organic'

Let's admit it: most of us  have our own definition of 'organic'  when we  speak of organic foods. Some  mean free of  antibiotics, or pesticides, or irradiation, or - in the case of animals, access to the out of doors  and humane treatment. 

"Sales of organic foods are growing by 10-20% each year and more than 10% of  fruits and  vegetables sold now are organic" states the lead of an article discussion the growing  national choice to find  and eat organic foods. Nutrition Action Healthletter (October 2012) discussed how organic is defined with various food products. Here is a summary of their discussion.


Organic  fruits, nuts, vegetables and  grains = no synthetic pesticides, no irradiation, no synthetic fertilizers, not genetically  engineered, and no  sewage  sludge applied.


 

 


Organic meat and poultry
= access to out of doors, not irradiated, no  growth hormones,  antibiotics or other drugs, raised on 100% organic feed, and  not fed  animal byproducts.





Organic eggs= hens fed 100% organic feed, no growth hormones, antibiotics, or other drugs, not necessarily cage-free or free-range.


Organic milk = cows have access to out of doors, no  growth  hormones, antibiotics, or other drugs, all cows' feed for the past 12 months 100% organic, at least 30% of cows' diet from the pasture during the primary growing season.








Organic seafood = no current official U.S. standards,USDA is working on a standard for farm-raised seafood. 


Packaged foods = "100% Organic" means that all ingredients are organic. "Organic" means that at least 95% of the ingredients are organic. "Made with organic  ingredients"  means that at least 70% of ingredients are organic.

 




Nutrition Action Healthletter is published by the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest.




News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News