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Plants for Beneficial Insects


It might seem a bit corny to say,"Feed them and they will come" - but consider this: feed them and they WILL come! (We are speaking of beneficial insects - very much wanted guests in the garden.)

For those of us who desire to set an enticing table for the good bugs perhaps the most important aspect of the planning is to plant so that something is always in bloom and is always a foliage, pollen or nectar source for the insects.

The much respected eco-magazine, Mother Earth News published a list of 19 plants that beneficial insects are drawn to. The list which follows includes the bloom time. (If some are unfamiliar Google images to see them).


Sweet alyssum (annual)... blooms spring through frost

Hairy vetch (annual)...spring to summer depending on seeding time

Angelica (perennial)...late spring

Common garden sage...late spring to early summer

Orange stonecrop (perennial - pictured below)...late spring to early summer


Thyme (perennial)...late spring to early summer

Catmint (perennial)...late spring to midsummer

Buckwheat (annual pictured below)...three weeks after planting; continues up to 10 weeks


Dill (annual)...summer

Fennel (perennial)...summer

Shasta daisy (perennial)...summer

Mints (perennial)...midsummer

Coreopsis (perennial)...summer to fall

Cilantro (annual) summer to fall if reseeded

Cosmos (annual)...summer to fall

Oregano (perennial)...summer to fall

Yarrows, common and fern-leaf (perennial)... summer to fall

Goldenrod (perennial)...late summer to fall

Asters (perennial)...late summer to fall



So here's the plan: any garden can have room for several of the spring-blooming plants, a couple of the summer bloomers and space for some of the lovely and enticing (to insects) fall bloomers. There! You have done it! You have set a table in the garden for beneficial insects. Your garden will love you for it.

News


15 Slow-Growing Seeds Smart Gardeners Start In April 

Some seeds must be started indoors in most parts of the country — otherwise their fruit may not come to maturity before fall frosts:

1. Basil

2. Broccoli

3. Cauliflower

4. Celery

5. Eggplant

6. Kohlrabi

7. Mint

8. Oregano

9. Peppers

10. Tomatoes

11. Cabbage

12. Cucumbers

13. Melons

14. Parsley

15. Squash (summer and winter, including zucchini)

 


more such survival gardening from Off the Grid News