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Black Hills Poultry Society

    For many area gardeners having a garden and having a flock of chickens seems natural. We are pleased to have the activities of the recently formed Black Hills Poultry Society posted on www.BlackHillsGarden. You will find here a calendar of upcoming events, perhaps some photos of folks and their favorite birds along with all the good reasons that gardens and chickens seem to go together (not to mention their delicious eggs!)

The mission of the society is to promote the keeping, breeding and exhibition of poultry of all kinds and to provide guidance and information from the wealth of experience from the most accomplished members.

The goal is to provide a fun, friendly atmosphere and encourage people of all ages to becomes involved with all breeds of poultry.

The group meets the third Friday of every month 6:30 p.m. at the West River Electric Association community meeting room. 

Persons who might be interested in keeping small flocks of chickens are  welcome to contact the society members at the information given below.

Contacts for the Black Hills Poultry Society are: blackhillspoultry@gmail.com and on Facebook as Black Hills Poultry Society or at 605-923-2366.


News

Summer Food in Wintry February

 

16 Popular Foods You Didn’t Know You Could Freeze

1. Garlic – You can freeze whole garlic, garlic cloves or chopped fresh garlic. Frozen garlic does lose some of its texture, but the flavor remains intact.

2. Corn – You can freeze fresh-picked corn on the cob for up to one year. Pack it in freezer bags — husk and silk and all. For store-bought corn, husk and blanch it before freezing.

3. Avocados – The bad news is that frozen avocados lose their consistency. The good news is that they do not lose their taste, so you can use them for guacamole or dressing. Wash and halve them before peeling. Freeze as halves, or puree them with lime or lemon juice and then store for up to eight months.

4. Mushrooms — You can freeze raw button, creminis and portabellas mushrooms for later use. Chop and slice mushrooms and then spread them on a cookie sheet. Freeze. Then transfer the pieces to bags or containers.

5. Onion – You can save chopping time – and tears – by freezing onion for cooking later. Store peeled, chopped onion in plastic freezer bags. The best part is you can just toss them into your recipes without thawing them first.

6. Hummus – Scoop your fresh hummus into plastic containers. Then drizzle a thin layer of olive oil on the top to keep it from drying out. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours before mixing and serving.


more such winter gardening from Off the Grid News